Alice World

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Sale 25% OFF

We have a special offer this month, 25% off Black Alice Silhouette - Hoodie Men's and women's

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Women's sweater

Sliders by Alice World

Flip Flops

Kids Raglan's

Welcome to Alice World

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Our World Alice World

Limited edition - Pre order t- shirts

From time to time we have limited edition T-shirts with Alice in wonderland inspired artwork produced by local artist's.

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Great Ormond Street Hospital

Great Ormond Street Hospital’s growth into an internationally famous centre for child healthcare started from modest beginnings in 1852, in a converted 17th Century townhouse on the corner of Powis Place. Dr Charles West, the principal founder of Hospital for Sick Children at Great Ormond Street,Dr West worked at the Universal Dispensary for Children and Women in Waterloo Road. He was determined to set up England’s first in-patient hospital for children. Through his own efforts, and through social contacts made by his fellow doctor, Henry Bence-Jones, a committee was formed in 1850 with support from eminent philanthropists and public health reformers such as Lord Shaftesbury, Baroness Burdett-Coutts and Edwin Chadwick of the Board of Health. By February 1852, sufficient backing had been obtained to open The Hospital for Sick Children at No. 49 Great Ormond Street, a mansion with a previous medical connection (left). It had been the home of Queen Anne’s physician, Dr Richard Mead, 150 years earlier, and the large extension Mead had added to house his library became the first hospital ward. Dr West had three principal ambitions for the Hospital, which remain the basis of its work today: the provision of healthcare to the children of the poor, the encouragement of clinical research in paediatrics, and the training of paediatric nurses. The Hospital was funded by subscriptions and donations. Its services were provided free of charge, exclusively for the children of the poor. Fundraising events, such as the Annual Festival Dinner, often attracted eminent speakers, including Charles Dickens, Oscar Wilde, senior clergymen and members of the Royal Family as speakers. In some years, this one event could raise almost half the Hospital’s total income. Wealthy donors and patrons could become Governors of the Hospital and were entitled to recommend a certain number of patients for admission each year, depending on their level of contribution. From 1868, individual beds were sponsored by wealthy benefactors, following an example set by the children’s magazine Aunt Judy. This could be done either for a fixed term or in perpetuity, depending on how much was given and remained an important source of income until the creation of the NHS.  Cots were endowed  in memory of loved ones, One such cot was endowed by Alice Hargreaves in memory of an old friend Lewis Carroll……

Supporting GOSH

Walk into our World - Alice World